Matt Lichtenwalner

Mobile mapper for TomTom - roaming the US and Canada constantly. Maybe a bit of art and/or writing here and there to spice things up.

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Assuming for a minute that you believe it exists, what is your definition of Good?

There are plenty of schools of philosophy that cover this, but that's not really what I'm looking for. I'm looking for a simplified "this is how I see it in daily life" definition. Specifically, how it applies to people. IOW - what does a good person do/think and what does an evil person do/think?

Or if it's easier for you to pin down, perhaps describe your definition of its sibling.

Also, I think two of my goals for this year will be:

1. Be less verbose.

2. Lose 100 lbs.

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1/6 '18 5 Comments
Good question. C.S. Lewis describes good-and-evil as something that we all (or at least all but a few) know innately. Even people who do evil things don't generally argue that there's no such thing as evil. They instead make excuses for how their actions aren't evil. The "golden rule" is a pretty good summary. Are you treating other people as you would want to be treated, or are you treating them as means to your own ends without regard for their feelings about it?
Brian Rapp 1/6 '18
A good standard indeed. (No pun intended.)

It's strange though as so many people's opinion on how they would expect to be treated (which is different than 'want', I grant) would vary widely.
I don’t believe in good people and evil people. That locks out complexity. I believe in good and evil actions and motives.

That said, I think good is seeking to avoid harm, and better, repair damage. Evil, I think, is seeking to cause harm, or ignore that which is hurting people/will decline into harm.
Rabbit 1/6 '18
Yeah, that sounds akin to where my head is at. Helping others - being uplifting - that seems key.
A good person thinks of others; thinks of how their own actions fit in the world and seeks to make the world a better place by reducing suffering.

A bad person thinks of themself without regard for the world, seeking only to gain personal advantage.

Have you investigated the writings of Buddhism? Moving past the unprovable bits of spirituality there are some solid bits of philosophy about taking personal responsibility in a world where one is never truly alone, and ones actions always have consequences.
Sean M Puckett 1/6 '18edited