To my astonishment, I've actually finished my first pass of converting the entire back end code base of one post wonder to modern async/await syntax. What does this mean for you? Absolutely nothing, except that it will be easier to maintain in the future, and I will hopefully be better able to get others to consider assisting in that task.

I'm making other changes as I go along that aim toward maintainability, and just making it hard to write bugs in the first place.

I reached a point where all I'm doing is testing and debugging, testing and debugging, until it actually works again, and I can think about pushing it as the new current release.

After that, it will be time to think about refactoring the front end code. Refactoring is a fancy word for rewriting, or at least restructuring. All I have to do is choose a front end framework so the code will be more maintainable for other contributors, easier for everyone to understand. All I have to do is choose a framework. Like, insert a list of at least 1000 possible choices. Of course, there are just a few well-known ones. If I go with React, people will know that word 10 years from now when they try to contribute to my code. This does not necessarily mean that what is called React in 10 years will look anything like it, but they'll know the word.

Seriously, I can see that I write software with very long release cycles. This makes me an excellent candidate to maintain the software stack for the interstellar multigenerational probe. Just slow me down and run me as a low priority process.

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11/30 '22 4 Comments
Slow me down to Priority Bitty and I'll dream away just like Walter Mitty. Oh, won't you please make me code.
Brian Rapp 11/30 '22
It’s sort of like cleaning the refrigerator, isn’t it? You do a ton of work in the name of household sanitation and sanity, then shut the door and walk away, and the house doesn’t look any cleaner. But…
The Martin Fowler and Kent Beck "Refactoring" text is one of the reference books I keep within arm's reach.
Chris Herdt 11/30 '22
That's a job in technology - often the result of kicking ass is a smoothly-running site/app/system ... meaning that if you're really good, no one notices. If you're not really good, your site/app/system crashes and EVERYONE notices.